Category: Gardening

Gardening

How to Start Garden on Your Patio

JonWritten by:

Living in an apartment comes with pros and cons. For example, you don’t have the hassle of cutting the lawn, but at the same time, you can’t have a garden. Or can you? I came across this problem several years ago, and through mistakes, and researching I found ways to turn my patio into a wonderful garden. If you have a patio, even a small one then you can have a garden of your own. It’s actually easier then you might think, and a patio garden requires very little maintenance. 

To start your own patio garden you will need containers large enough for the vegetable that you are planting. You will also need potting soil, which can be purchased for less than two dollars for a forty-pound bag, and your seeds or young plants. Moreover, you can get all these items at an affordable price on https://www.madburyroad.com/outdoor-daybeds/ along with the best patio furniture that is available in the market. 

There are several vegetables that are ideal for container growing such as the following.

Snap beans:

Beans grow best in five-gallon containers. Place your container near a railing for an extra-large, and happy crop. The easiest beans to grow are Bush, Blue Lake, Bush “Romano,” and Tender Crop. You can plant these from seeds, and you can grow several plants in one five-gallon container. You can plant beans in both spring, and fall.

Broccoli:

One plant in a five-gallon container. The easiest broccoli to grow in a container is DeCicco and Green Comet. Broccoli grows best in cold weather.

Carrots:

Carrots grow best in a five-gallon container which is at least twelve inches deep. Some of the easiest carrots to grow are Danvers Half Long, Short Sweet, and Tiny Sweets. Carrots can be planted in both spring and fall, but they do better with cooler weather.

Cucumbers:

Cucumbers can be planted in one-gallon containers. The easiest cucumbers to grow are Patio Pik, Pot Luck, and Spacemaster. Cucumbers can be planted in both spring and fall. Avoid watering them in the late afternoon to prevent diseases.

Eggplant:

Plant your eggplant in a five-gallon container. Eggplants, like cucumbers, should not be watered in the late afternoon. The easiest varieties of eggplant to grow are Black Beauty, Ichiban, and Slim Jim.

Lettuce:

Lettuce should be planted in five-gallon containers. Lettuce can be planted in spring or fall, but they grow better in cooler weather. The easiest lettuce to grow is Ruby and Salad Bowl. You can cut the outsides leaves for salads without damaging the plant.

Onions:

Onions can be planted in five-gallon containers, and are easy to grow. The easiest onions to grow from containers are White Sweet Spanish and Yellow Sweet Spanish. Onions grow best when planted in the fall.

Peppers:

Plant on the plant in a two-gallon container or five plants in a five-gallon container. The easiest pepper to grow is Cayenne, Long Red, Sweet Banana, Wonder (Bell), Yolo. Pepper is best planted in spring, as they freeze easily. You can plant them indoors in December, and then move them to your patio after the last frost. Peppers are slow growers, but once they start to produce you will be amazed at your crop.

Radishes:

Plant one radish plant in a two-gallon container or five plants in a fifteen-gallon container. Radishes mature quickly and can be planted in both spring or fall. The easiest radishes to grow are Cherry Belle and Icicle.

Tomatoes:

You can plant tomatoes in a five-gallon container. One plant per container. Tomatoes can be planted in spring and fall. The easiest tomatoes to plant in containers are Early Girl, Patio, Small Fry, Sweet 100, and Tiny Tim.

As you can see there is plenty of room, even on a small patio to have a garden. Five-gallon buckets are inexpensive and make great containers for planting. Just remember that your container needs drainage. Make sure your container has several holes in the bottom of it. If you still need a helping hand to visit the Ferry-Morse website this is a great place to find more tips. There is nothing better than eating something that you grew yourself, which makes it all worthwhile.